WORKSHOP Launching GWonline, the Bibliography, Filmography, and Webography on Gender, War and the Western World since 1600

 

Friday, 21 April 2017

2:00 – 7:30 pm • UNC Wilson Library • Pleasants Family Assembly Room

 

WHAT IS DIGITAL HUMANITIES?

In recent years, digital humanities [DH] has with much fanfare received the label of “the next big thing” in the humanities. The capacities of DH to facilitate new ways of gathering and analyzing data, interdisciplinary collaboration and engagement with broader audiences seem evident. Yet the approach’s possibilities and limitations are contested. By asking “What is digital humanities?” and creating a forum for debate, the workshop intends to foster the interdisciplinary exploration of this question and to inspire a long-term, campus-wide dialogue. We want to discuss the use of DH as a tool for research, teaching and public history, as well as to consider the alternative visions of DH: as “making stuff” (i.e., maps, databases, digital archives) and as a platform for making arguments, as in traditional forms of humanities.

The workshop will feature the rollout of the DH project GWonline: The Bibliography, Filmography, and Webography on Gender, War and the Western World since 1600, which collects and organizes secondary literature, women’s autobiographies, films and informative websites on this subject to make them available to the broader public. The project is connected to the Oxford Handbook on Gender, War and the Western World since 1600 (General Editor: Karen Hagemann), which explores how gender, an amalgam of ideals and practices that give meaning to and socially differentiate male and female, shaped war, warfare and the military and, at the same time, was transformed by them. The online database allows users to search bibliographical information through multiple entry points: by author or director, publication or release date, collections, major wars, keywords or Oxford Handbook chapters. Additionally, a full text search function is available. The website is equipped with an OPEN URL feature that allows users to immediately check whether articles, books etc. are available in their local library.

For a PDF  of the  program  click here

Program

Graduate Luncheon Seminar: Digital Mapping in Historical Research and Teaching

11:30 – 1:30 pm • UNC Chapel Hill • Hamilton Hall 569

For a registration please click here

Seminar with STEPHEN ROBERTSON (George Mason University, Director, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media)

Since 2003, digital history has occupied a central place Stephen Robertson’s research, in the form of Digital Harlem, a site that integrates material from a diverse range of sources to produce maps that offer visualizations of the complexity of everyday life in the 1920s. The site formed part of a collaborative project involving colleagues at the University of Sydney. Digital Harlem won the American Historical Association’s inaugural Rosenzweig Prize for Innovation in Digital History and the American Library Association’s ABC-CLIO Digital History Prize in 2010. Robertson is the author of Crimes against Children: Sexual Violence and Legal Culture in New York City, 1880-1960, and co-author of Playing the Numbers: Gambling in Harlem Between the Wars, the first major study of numbers gambling, an enterprise central to African-American economic, social and cultural life in the 1920s and 1930s. He is currently working on a book on undercover investigators in American life from the Civil War to World War II, and collaborating with Shane White and Stephen Garton on a digital project, Year of the Riot: Harlem 1935, and with Sean Takats on Tropy, software to allow researchers to organize and describe the digital photographs they take in archives, and to share them with those institutions.

Moderation: AARON HALE-DORELL (UNC Chapel Hill, Department of History)

Suggested Readings for the Seminar:

Workshop: What is Digital Humanities?

2:00 – 7:00 pm • UNC Chapel Hill • UNC Wilson Library Pleasants Family Assembly Room

 

2:00 – 2:15 pm: Welcome and Introduction

JONATHAN HARTLYN   (Senior Associate Dean for Social Sciences and Global Programs, UNC Chapel Hill College of Arts and Sciences

KAREN HAGEMANN (UNC–Chapel Hill, James G. Kenan Distinguished Professor of History)

2:15 – 3:30 pm:

Keynote: What is Digital Humanities? Trends, Possibilities and Limits

STEPHEN ROBERTSON (George Mason University, Director, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media)

3:30 – 4:00 pm: Coffee Break

4:00 – 6:00 pm:

Roundtable: What is Digital Humanities?

Response: STEPHEN ROBERTSON

Moderation: KAREN HAGEMANN

6:00 – 6:15 pm: Break

6:15 – 7:00 pm:

Launch of GWonline: The Bibliography, Filmography, and Webography on Gender, War and the Western World since 1600

ORGANIZERS:

CONVENERS: